Attention: Patients Infected With “Superbug” CRE

While at UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh

In 2012, several patients tested positive for CRE (carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae) or “super bug” after being treated at UPMC Presbyterian Hospital after undergoing a screening process called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP. This process uses a flexible endoscope made by the Olympus Medical Corporation to diagnose gastrointestinal problems. The scope was determined to harbor the bacteria that causes CRE even after being cleaned as per the guidelines set forth by both the FDA and the scope manufacturer. Although none of these patients died as a direct result of the infection, some experienced heart failure or other chronic conditions.

Olympus did not warn hospitals in the United States that their scopes had the potential to spread antibiotic-resistant infections from patient to patient until February 19, 2015.  The FDA issued its first Safety Communication on the issue the same day, warning hospitals that antibiotic-resistant pathogens were resistant to cleaning in accordance with guidelines issued by Olympus.

Other Articles On This Topic:

Superbug Reaches Pittsburgh Hospital by Brendan Lupetin
Olympus Kept U.S. Hospitals in the Dark About the Risk of Infection from Endoscopes by Greg Unatin

If you or a loved one were among those that became infected with CRE or “superbug” while a patient at UPMC, and you experienced life-threatening or life-altering complications we invite you to contact us to schedule a free case evaluation.

All articles in this blog are the collaborative effort of attorneys Jerry Meyers, Brendan Lupetin, and Gregory Unatin.

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